by band member

How an Indie-Rock Label Saved My Life

Source: 
Rolling Stone
Author: 
John Roderick
Publication date: 
November 7, 2013

How an Indie-Rock Label Saved My Life

There's no way I should have been able to make a career as a rock musician. I mean, there are thousands of singer/songwriters out there who are better, younger, smarter and prettier than I am. My career should have ended up like most of the bands I came up with, like most of the frustrated and talented songwriters everywhere. You give it your best shot and then quit when you turn thirty and get a job at Amazon or Microsoft. That's the Seattle way.

The reality is, I didn't even release my first album until I was thirty-two. By all rights I should have been laughed out of every bar and record label office in the country, but instead I spent ten years on tour in America and Europe, bought a house, and continue to make a living as a musician even now, all while most people, even hardcore music fans, haven't heard of me. How?

The answer is: a small, indie record label.  » read more

Seattle's Stalinism

Source: 
Seattle Weekly Reverb Residency
Author: 
John Roderick
Publication date: 
October 5, 2011

John Roderick Reverb Residency: Seattle's Stalinism

Hey, John: Tell me something: Why do Seattleites call Nevermind "the Nirvana Record"? What, we're just supposed to know which record they're talking about? How pretentious!
--C.R.K., the south end

Roderick: The first paradox of Seattle is: No one will discuss Nirvana with you in a straightforward way unless they're sure you can be trusted, and it is impossible to trust anyone who wants to talk about Nirvana. You have to understand that the grunge years were a period of Stalinistic paranoia. Agents of the Credibility Police were listening in on every conversation, their stocking caps and long underwear stained with the tears of the insufficiently blasé. I watched many good people, innocent people, publicly SNEERED TO DEATH for even suggesting that the band Bush might have a couple of good songs.  » read more

Sean's Tour Diary - Part 6 of 6

Source: 
The Long Winters official website
Author: 
Sean Nelson
Publication date: 
June 30, 2003

Sean's Tour Diary
Part 6 June 17-21

Day Twenty-Four

Tuesday, June 17
Toronto, Ontario. Horseshoe Tavern.
w/ The Trews, two other bands (sorry)
"When I asked you why Ontario, you said it sounds good on the radio."
Another day, another border crossing. An uneventful one, too, thankfully. It was a close call, actually. It looked like we were about to get the full treatment, but then our guards got called away to some urgent matter at another car, and we were waved away. While we were waiting, a small hatchback pulled up and four distinguished looking Arab men stepped out, walking ruefully towards the office inside. Nodding hello to them, I couldn't help but think how unbelievably worse the prospect of a border crossing must be for them. But enough cryptosociological pseudopolitical insights. It's time to rock the Horseshoe.  » read more

Sean's Tour Diary - Part 5 of 6

Source: 
The Long Winters official website
Author: 
Sean Nelson
Publication date: 
June 30, 2003

Sean's Tour Diary
Part 5 June 13-16

Day Twenty

Friday, June 13
Philadelphia, PA. The Khyber.
W/ 3 other bands.
"Jacob Javits, I'd like to thank you for everything (primarily, your glass house)."
It's almost not worth writing about this show, because it was almost not worth playing this show, because it was almost not worth travelling through three hours of nightmarish traffic and pissing rain to arrive at a bar with a lousy PA and an aggro jukebox, where we would be first on a bill of five bands, playing from 8-9, before any reasonable person would be at a rock show in the first place, especially since it's not all-ages.  » read more

Sean's Tour Diary - Part 4 of 6

Source: 
The Long Winters official website
Author: 
Sean Nelson
Publication date: 
June 30, 2003

Sean's Tour Diary
Part 4 June 8-12

Days Fifteen, Sixteen & Seventeen

Sunday-Tuesday, June 8-10
Bethel, NY. Governor's Bluff.
Three days off.
"Time passes slowly up here in the mountains. We sit beside rivers and walk beside fountains."  » read more

Sean's Tour Diary - Part 3 of 6

Source: 
The Long Winters official website
Author: 
Sean Nelson
Publication date: 
June 30, 2003

Sean's Tour Diary
Part 3 June 2-June 7

Days Ten & Eleven / Monday-Tuesday, June 2-3

Booth Bay, ME. Anderson home. Two days off.
“We are the victims of the pleasures of the sense of hearing.”  » read more

Sean's Tour Diary - Part 2 of 6

Source: 
The Long Winters official website
Author: 
Sean Nelson
Publication date: 
June 30, 2003

Sean's Tour Diary
Part 2 May 28-June 1

Day Six & Seven / Wednesday, May 28-Thursday May 29

Detroit, MI/Windsor, Ontario. Border crossing.
“My name’s Tim and I’m a criminal.”  » read more

Sean's Tour Diary - Part 1 of 6

Source: 
The Long Winters official website
Author: 
Sean Nelson
Publication date: 
June 30, 2003

Sean's Tour Diary
Part 1 May 23-May 28

Day One / Friday, May 23

Denver, CO. Lion's Lair
w / The Wind-Up Merchants

"We are out drinking. We are out smoking. You think this is living?
Well, you got to be joking."
  » read more

The Believer - Sedaratives

Source: 
The Believer Music Issue July/August 2011
Author: 
John Roderick
Publication date: 
July 1, 2011

excerpt:

SEDARATIVES
A MONTHLY ADVICE COLUMN

This month: guest columnist John Roderick

Dear Sedaratives,
How did railroads get to be so romanticized? Have you been on a train for any distance? It’s horrible. It’s an experience in bumpy patience, always overpriced, and always late. So why do people still love trains so much?
Cap’n Stan
St. Louis, Mo.

Dear Cap’n Stan,  » read more

The Morning News Tournament of Books

Source: 
The Morning News
Author: 
John Roderick
Publication date: 
March 29, 2011

The Morning News Tournament of Books Semifinals
James Hynes - Next
v.
The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake - Aimee Bender

Judged by John Roderick

Contrasting the two novels, Next by James Hynes, and The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake by Aimee Bender seemed like it should be an easy task. In the first few pages Hynes introduced a callow, insecure male protagonist obsessed with sex and reflecting back on his life in a climate of modern anxiety, while Bender produced a thoughtful but guarded young female protagonist trapped in a dysfunctional family and fixated on food. Thank God contemporary fiction is moving beyond sweeping gender stereotypes, I thought.  » read more

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